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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
-american. maryland did it. >> i'm curious why you think president bill clinton since he has the freedom hillary doesn't, why hasn't he apologized for this stain on his record? >> in 2009 before obama, not a very expansive or hugely heartfelt way, said i'm now for marriage equality. again it was not a big statement. i think he feels like i did that, what more do i have to do. i think doma is such a nasty bit of legislation, codified bigotry, it calls for more robust than that. >> the important divergence that frank is identifying between the two democratic presidents. president obama's justice department did make the unusual step of deciding not to defend the constitutionality of doma, typically the justice department defends everything because it is the lawyer of the laws of the land. here they have the discretion to do otherwise. they did otherwise. it makes a difference. as the lower courts and potentially the supreme court, as they look at this, they look to the political branches and now we have the president of the united states, one of the political branches saying this is not constitutional, i
can tell you, it's not a hard ask, it's a partnership. and actually, as much as bill clinton and newt gingrich loatheds each other at times, they worked together to deal with -- >> on impeachment. >> to deal with republicans like myself on balancing the budget for the first time in a generation, balancing it four years for the first time since the 1920s, paying down the national debt. and you know what? newt gingrich always had to fight us on his right flank, and he and bill clinton sat in the white house and strategized. >> i have a question. >> republican votes for that first clinton budget that set them on the path. >> joe, i've got -- >> hold on. come on, richard. you must have been sleeping or somewhere in britain in '95, '96, '97, '98 and '99 when we balanced the budget for the first time in a generation. >> joe, i have a question for you. let's say boehner goes back to his caucus and says, you know what? from the president's first proposal, i was able to shave off $600 billion in tax hikes. >> right. >> so i saved that. >> by the way, we're going to end up at, like, 1.2, aren't
we could do is go over the fiscal cliff. we have the same tax rates that we have when bill clinton was president. significant cuts in defense and also significant human services can you tell us. >> katie, let me ask you, before you respond to what governor dean is saying. there is logic to what howard dean is saying. i don't happen to agree with it. but i know where he's coming from. katie, let me ask you this -- katie can't hear me. we'll wait for her to get back hooked in. howard, what about the notion that i'm posing tonight -- i've said this a few times -- republicans better be careful. they're not going down your road and the democrats aren't going down your road. you have middle class tax cuts for the democrats and it sometimes sounds to me as an old reagan conservative that the republicans better watch themselves because sometimes it sounds like they are kind of defending rich people. that's their whole mantra, just defending rich people. and i think that's not where they should be. >> i would agree. if i were politically advising the republicans, which i'm certainly not, i
rate we had when bill clinton was president and our economy kree aed nearly 23 million new jobs. >> and there are reports that republicans are considering a doomsday plan should talks break down. according to senior republican sources the gop would allow a vote on extending bush tax cuts for the middle class and nothing more. under one variation of this plan, house republicans would vote present on the bill to voice their disapproval but still allowing it to pass entirely on democratic votes. >>> with hillary clinton wrapping up her final trip abroad as secretary of state, president obama is expected to announce his pick to replace her at the state department as early as this week. the white house says no decision has been made. but u.n. ambassador susan rice and john kerry are rumored to be the top choices. senator john mccain, one of rice's most outspoken republican critics has been a long time friend of kerries in the senate and there was a light moment between the two at a press conference yesterday. >> i would hope our colleagues would leap at the opportunity to do that. se
. her president, former president bill clinton, was president obama's key surrogate during this election cycle, setting the stage for president obama to return the favor in 2016. if she so decides to run. remember earlier this week, she was at the save and center for middle east policy and they ran that glossy video that felt like a campaign video in which she was praised by a number of officials, including president benjamin netanyahu. the stage sbing set f that's what she decides. if you go deeper into that poll, 66% of women say she should run, so higher than the national average. that would be one of her core constituencies. those close to me tell me when she steps down she'll focus on resting. >> to be frank, though, i think she's deserved a well-deserved rest. >> reporter: absolutely. i gave birth to my daughter on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. look th
of bill clinton terry mcauliffe as the democratic nominee. some people are painting this as a tea party against the clintons in mcauliffe. things can still happen. it looks like a fascinating race. >> chris, as you know, political reporters, we only have two gubernatorial races to cover. we give a lot of attention to virginia and new jersey. what's fascinating about virginia, since i've been covering politics on the national stage, the off-year election has proved to be a template if that party that's out of power wins. 2005, tim kaine ends up running a race, appealing to independents, sfresing his religious faith. actually kind of having a very soft appeal to a lot of folks. he's adopted that 2006 and 2008. a lot of the ideas barack obama ran on in 2008 was tim cane. >> he endorsed him for president, just as a sidebar. >> mcdonnell was focused like a laser on the economy. what did we see republicans do? focus on the economy. try to turn social issues away. he was very successful in 2005. house republicans and senate republicans successful. mitt romney not so much in 2012. that's why vi
for tax reform and robert reish, former secretary of labor for president bill clinton and the author of "beyond outrage." none of the three of us are beyond outrage, grover norquist, which is why i keep having you back. the situation it seems to me as an impartial observer here is that both sides have now made fairly ludicrous offers that they know the other side is never going to accept in a million years. that does beg the question, grover, why bother, given that both sides know where they need to move, why the games? >> well, it's not clear that both sides know. the week after the election, president obama was asked do you have to have the higher rates or could we have deductions and credits and he said he was open to negotiations. three weeks later, after thanksgiving, he shows up and all of a sudden there's a line in the sand on rates that had come out of nowhere, so the president seems to be moving the goal posts in a deliberate effort, i don't know, to extract something, to push people over the fiscal cliff. something's going on and it's not clear because he's not where he use
that looming fiscal avalanche can we expect anything big to come out of it? doug schoen former adviser to bill clinton. monica crowley, fox news contributor. i it's the thing to do. you get a call. >> president obama has a pattern of inviting political opponents, business leaders to the white house for some sort of confab. what it kals end ends up being is a photo opportunity so he looks like he's extending himself to the opposition, he's bipartisan, and he is neither of those things. bill: would you accept that invite. >> i would accept in a heartbeat. bill: monica is saying nada on this. >> i would be more optimistic on this. we are groping for bi-partisanship. if governor romney has things to share and ways to bridge the fiscal cliff this is all good. bill: we went back to the vault to figure out what they are not going to talk about. we found this first of all, okay. i want you to listen to. roll it. >> i've been in business for 25 years. i have no idea what you're talking about. i had a friend who said you don't just pick the winners and losers, you pick the losers. bill: i've been in bus
declined. bill clinton dropped in to see george h.w. bush after winning the 1992 election, and you would have thought that they had always been the best of friends. >> very, very friendly and very helpful. >> reporter: one topic that never came up in today's meeting, the campaign. no wonder they had such a good time. but things don't always go that well. george w. bush's meeting with al gore in 2000 was notable only for its brevity. >> i think in general, they're very awkward, but that photo op tells the world, really, that america's back, operating as one united country. >> reporter: now, the white house won't say whether the president will ask romney's help on any particular issue, as he suggested he might on election night. and we won't know anything about the meeting except what they tell us, because the two men will be having lunch alone and there won't be a chance to ask because there's no press coverage. charlie, norah? >> bill plante, thank you. csu political director john dickerson is with us again. john, good morning. >> charlie. >> we had this conversation with stuart stevens
and a failure of leadership and america deserves better. >> it's true when bill clinton left office in 2000 we had you are plus and the deficit would have been eliminated as we sit here today what changed that was the republican president and congress. what put us on the path we are on now is not democrats. we would have no collective debt at all if we had left in place the clinton budgetary strategy. megyn: what do you make of that quote. >> what i'm responding to is i think what we are dealing with is a tell poar a temporal thing. it would drive the markets down and create say could and uncertainty. the president is saying we can't go through that again. megyn: he's wanting not only to raise it but to have uniform authority to raise. a fewer years ago they were saying that was a failure of leadership. >> he may not get it but he's right to argue that way the republicans have been doing this has been irresponsible. let's get this done in the way our democracy has worked the for hundreds of years. not this new extraordinary thing. i think he's right to put pressure on the republicans. megyn: i
in their impact. i know you do, mr. speaker, leon panetta, former chief of staff to president bill clinton, former chairman of the democratic-led budget committee here in the u.s. house of representatives, current secretary of defense calls these defense cuts devastating. this u.s. house has passed a proposal to prevent that second round of cuts from taking place. it's the only proposal anywhere in this town to have passed. we did in august. we took care of our business and we have yet to have partnership from either the white house or the senate. on that proposal. we took the sequester replacement reconciliation act in may. we took care of the job prevention recession act in august, mr. speaker. we took care of the national security and job protection act in september, mr. speaker. the work of this house has been done. month after month after month. we passed two budgets in a row, mr. speaker, that take on the tough challenges of entitlement reform, that take on the tough challenges of increasing revenue, that take on the challenges that no congress in my lifetime has ever taken on, mr. speaker.
their plan. let's see if it adds up. bill clinton made it very clear the arithmetic they're using doesn't add up. they know that we're not going to do certain things. we know they're not going to do certain things. but you cannot get there without a balanced plan. we understand that. you need cuts in spending. you need to deal with entitlements and you also need revenues. let's be real. i don't think, frankly, mr. boehner, and what he said, absolutely no increase in rates. you want to do it by cutting preference items. but he hasn't come up with his list of preference items. the reason he hasn't come up with his list of preference items is because he knows he can't get the votes to do it. and frankly, he doesn't politically want to propose it. let's see -- >> perhaps this is the starting point. we're here. we'll get there. >> congressman hoyer thank you for joining us. >> thank you, sir. >> let's be real. >> thanks, congressman. still ahead this morning here on "starting point" 23 minutes past the hour. bonuses for shutting down hostess. why executives are raking in the money next. ans believ
of the filibuster, but other methods of instruction with bill clinton's who reached out all the time. so i think that's a factor, but a minor one. i think kerry reads use of filling the amendment tree, partly this is chicken and egg, but is been done too much and that could result in at least some protests and willingness of some senators on his side you might not otherwise join some of these filibusters to do so. but it had much more to do with a concerted party strategy, which i think it's really the first time we've seen it. >> i think there's two separate issues. one obstruction on nomination and to come the obstructions on the legislative. on the nomination site, it is true you see these judge votes and they happen to go 992.one. it's important to remember what we are talking about. the alternative to that is to move it by unanimous consent. this is not like the house for thursday though. the member objects unanimous consent because they do not want to vote or don't want to be forced to vote for a judge with whom they may disagree but support, they say i will have the roll call. the majorit
, but i could go back to knot the use of the filibuster but other methods of obstruction with bill clinton who reached out all the time. so i think that's the factor but a minor one. i think harry reid's use of filling the amendment tree, partly this is chicken and egg, but has been done too much and that didn't result in at least some protests and willingness of some senators on his side who might otherwise have joined in some of these filibusters to do so. it had much more to do with a concerted party strategy can which i think is the first time we have seen it. >> i think there's two separate issues. one, obstruction on nominations, and to come obstruction on -- [inaudible] it is true you see these judges and it will go 99 points. but i think it's important to remember what we are talking about. the alternative to that is to move it by unanimous consent. it's not like the house where there is about. and if a member of checks to unanimous consent because they do not want to vote, don't want to be forced to vote for a judge, they say i will have a roll call. now, the majority leader at th
his son's aspberger's syndrome. two eye-opening visits with former presidents bill clinton and george w. bush. that'll do it. at the end of their journey, ron concluded this in part, quote, rather than sweat over it, i now realize how much i'd miss if he was ant an aspie, his humor, bluntness, obsessions with everything from video games to family. i saw through both presidents a successful future in tyler. in clinton, big possibilities for a boy with sharp mind and rough edges. in bush, tyler's gift of humor as a means to find confidence in himself and connections with others. i learned that while tyler was not my idealized son, he was the ideal one. in the oval office years ago, i thought bush had ordered me to love that boy in spite of his idiosyncrasies, now i realize i love my son because of them. okay. i'm going to cry. that's beautiful. >> thank you. >> sounds like an incredible journey for both of you. >> it was. it was my wife's idea. and it's a remarkable gift she gave us to make us go on the road together. and the two presidents, the graciousness they showed in spending time
the budget of the united states when he was chief of staff for bill clinton. he knows the game. he is a master negotiator. >> you are wearing me out. [laughter] >> i am older than you. it is a great privilege. what i am fascinated by, when this report came out, it was deafening. what are these guys doing? they are talking about revenues, spending cuts, and we sat in that room for seven months, and we come out with five democrats and five republicans and one independent, and if you do not think that is tough to get a range like that, you do not know anything about meetings or conferences or commissions. that is what we have got. across the street was the national association of realtors. i live with a realtor. she is not doing that anymore. she was a good lobbyist. she was tremendous. they just chuckled. home mortgage interest deduction? you guys are stupid. you will get rid of us. we do not get rid of it. take it from $1 million to $500,000. give everyone else a 12% non refundable tax credit. helps the little guy that everybody talks about. everything we did is set this, get rid of
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)